Reminder: Pro-Life Mass at 7pm This Wednesday

August 11, 2018

Please note a change from our usual timetable. As this month’s pro-life Mass falls on the Feast of the Assumption, 15th August, we will be joining the Parish of Blessed John Duns Scotus for their Mass at 7pm. There will be no adoration / rosary / refreshments. You are still very welcome to join us in praying for the pro-life cause.

Venue: Blessed John Duns Scotus RC Church, 270 Ballater Street, Gorbals, Glasgow, G5 0YT

 

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Day for Life

June 1, 2017

Yesterday, 31st May, was the Feast of the Visitation and the Day for Life in Scotland. We celebrated with Mass in our chapel. The celebrant was Fr Ross Campbell. Sr Jess transitioned to the next stage of discernment and formation, noviciate.

Every day, at 3 pm, we say a prayer for life. This is a prayer to Our Lady, from the ‘Gospel of Life’ 105. We invite you to join us in this daily prayer:

“O Mary, bright dawn of the new world, Mother of the living, to you do we entrust the cause of life: Look down, O Mother, upon the vast numbers of babies not allowed to be born, of the poor whose lives are made difficult, of men and women who are victims of brutal violence, of the elderly and the sick killed by indifference or out of misguided mercy. Grant that all who believe in your Son may proclaim the Gospel of Life with honesty and love to the people of our time. Obtain for them the grace to accept that Gospel as a Gift ever new, the joy of celebrating it with gratitude throughout their lives and the courage to bear witness to it resolutely, in order to build, together with all people of good will, the civilisation of truth and love, to the praise and glory of God, the Creator and lover of life.”


The Transfiguration of the Lord

August 6, 2015

The feast of the Transfiguration of Christ celebrates the revelation of Christ’s divine glory on Mount Tabor in Galilee (Matthew 17:1-6; Mark 9:1-8; Luke 9:28-36). After revealing to His disciples that He would be put to death in Jerusalem (Matthew 16:21), Christ, along with Ss. Peter, James, and John, went up the mountain. There, St. Matthew writes, “he was transfigured before them. And his face did shine as the sun: and his garments became white as snow.”

The brightness was not something added to Christ but the manifestation of His true divine nature. For Peter, James, and John, it was also a glimpse of the glories of heaven and of the resurrected body promised to all Christians. As Christ was transfigured, two others appeared with Him: Moses, representing the Old Testament Law, and Elijah, representing the prophets. Thus Christ, Who stood between the two and spoke with them, appeared to the disciples as the fulfillment of both the Law and the prophets.

Icon of the Transfiguration (Russian, 15th century)

At Christ’s baptism in the Jordan, the voice of God the Father was heard to proclaim that “This is my beloved Son” (Matthew 3:17). During the Transfiguration, God the Father pronounced the same words (Matthew 17:5).

Despite the importance of this event, the Feast of the Transfiguration was not among the earliest of the Christian feasts. It was celebrated in Asia starting in the fourth or fifth century and spread throughout the Christian East in the centuries following. The Catholic Encyclopedia notes that it wasn’t commonly celebrated in the West until the tenth century. To celebrate the great Christian victory at the Siege of Belgrade in 1456, during which the Muslim Turks were routed and the Islamic advance into Europe was halted, Pope Callixtus III elevated the Transfiguration to a feast of the universal Church and established August 6 as the date of its celebration